Blog

Abbot Academy, Events, Speakers, yes+

Take Back The Night 2020

by Emma S. ’20

For the past five years the Brace center has organized a Take Back the Night march and vigil at Phillips Acadmey to stand in solidarity with all survivors and speak out against sexual assault, harrasment, and gender-based violence. Traditionally, our program has ended with a community circle on Abbot Campus uniting us in light and love.

While we are not able to gather together physically, many members of the extended PA community still stand together in support of survivors through song, dance, poetry, and word. Brace students and adults have worked together to create a video version of Take Back the Night that includes all of these messages of support and love. Our hope is that this video will unite us all in support of survivors and in the fight to end gender-based violence.

This video, and its content  deals with topics related to sexual assault, harassment, gender based violence, and self-harm. If you are feeling triggered or need a safe space, please visit some of these resources (https://bit.ly/tbtn_resources). Ensuring safety for yourself is a sign of strength, not weakness.


 

 

This video will go live on the evening of May 19th, 2020 – at the time that we would be starting this event on campus.  It will be available for viewing for a limited about of time.


If you are able, please join the Brace Center for a community conversation following the release of this video.  

brace fellows, Events, Speakers

Faculty Brace Fellow: Dr. Stephanie Sparling Williams

May 20th, 2020
6:30 pm
Live Session!
The Brace Center for Gender Studies is pleased to invite the community for a live Q+A with its 2019 Faculty Fellow, Dr. Stephanie Sparling Williams. Dr. Williams is the current associate curator for the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum and former visiting scholar in art history and assistant curator at the Addison Gallery.
Dr. Williams’s project “investigates connections between technology and the body, particularly how these seemingly disparate entities relate to and impact the creative praxis of women-identified artists of color.” Her timely investigation of these issues is framed by a series of questions, which include “What are the implications of post-human theories on gender and race identity constructs in art and media cultures?” and “How do modern technologies shape how women-identified artists of color approach their work?” These questions lead to a deep inquiry into “intersectional histories of technology, critical gender and race theory in game design and gaming cultures, studies in advanced technologies of art and visual culture, theories of post-humanism, the body, cyborgs, avatars, and technological surrogate studies.”
On Wednesday, May 20, at 6:30 pm, Dr. Williams will be available for a live Q+A session via Zoom. Zoom meeting information will be available on the day of the Q+A.  Questions can be submitted ahead of time and during the live session.

Click here to register for the Q&A Session with Dr. Williams.

Click here to submit questions for the Q&A session ahead of time.  

Events

International Women’s Day 2020

The Brace Center celebrated International Women’s Day during exam week of Winter Term.  A delicious, super-tasty cake awaited students in Commons for snack and/or dessert.  Yum!

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International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women’s equality.

Events, yes+

Yes+ and Bio100 collaboration on body-positive health education.

Students in Intro to Biology (aka Bio100) attended several sessions by yes+, Phillips Academy’s peer-to-peer sex educators.  Led by Dr. Cath Kemp and José Navarro Peralta, Instructors in Biology, the initiative is part of a broader curricular design of the introductory biology class to embed relevant issues of race, gender, and sexuality into the science curriculum.  Since not all 9th graders take Bio100, some dorms and other 9th grade classes joined bio students for this presentation.

Some student reflections:

“I did not know that different people felt pleasure in different ways. This was meaningful to me because it shows that everyone is different, so communication in a relationship is important.”

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“I didn’t know that girls masturbated.”

“One thing I already knew was the important of protection when having sexual intercourse. I learned about this in 6th grade when I had my first sex-ed class. This is memorable because it is very important to my own health and the future partner’s health as well.”

“One thing I learned is the how frequent intersex babies are born.  This is important because it was something I barely though existed but learned that it is more common than I thought. This changes my thinking on the topic because it enforces the fact of how people are expected to choose a sex and doctors encourage “correctional” surgery to intersex babies.”

“Even though many of us were initially suspicious of this presentation, it was an important presentation. We never talk about it in class and it is great to talk about things that affect all of us. We don’t talk about it and I feel it is very valuable that we actually do.”